First Aid

I finally picked up that Big Red Book to refresh my knowledge of flight safety and security last week. And I passed the exams, as everyone did in my class.

These flight safety recurrents, as they are called, take place twice a year and cover many subjects.
For example, there is first aid. We’re not expected to be proficient nurses, but as we’re high up in the sky without a hospital nearby, it’s quite handy to know a little about first aid when confronted with a medical emergency. Like, first of all, how to recognise one. Which sounds simpler than it is.
As I said, we’re not medically skilled, so in the event of emergencies we have to call in professional help. The flight crew can make a call to a doctor in Amsterdam at any moment. Amazingly though, if medical assistance is needed, there often happens to be a medically skilled person on board.

First Aid Kit

I’m lucky as all the medical incidents that ever occurred on my flights had a fortunate outcome.
I remember an incident with a passenger who wasn’t feeling well. He made his way to the lavatory but fainted on a woman’s lap. As I was asking my colleague to call for a doctor, the lady on whose lap the man had fainted told me she was a nurse. Her neighbour added: “And I’m a doctor”. They took care of the patient and he was soon feeling better. On another flight, a passenger was complaining about pain in his chest. Suspecting heart problems, we called for a doctor right away. Whereupon a whole bunch of passengers responded. One of them explained that there was a conference for cardiologists the next day! This time too, the patient was doing well again by the end of the flight.

While I was practising on the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) dummy during my flight safety recurrent the other day, I realised that one day this could be a real person.
Some of my colleagues have witnessed serious medical incidents on their flights. When I hear their stories, I realise that such an experience can be quite emotional. For the patient, his or her travelling companions, the passengers in the vicinity, and, of course, the cabin crew.

Caroline

Posted by:   Caroline  | 
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Edo de Roo

It happened twice to me, that medical assistance was needed on a flight. The first time, a doctor was sitting just behind the person in need, so that was good luck. But the second time, it was up to the stewardesses, and then you can be better prepared a bit.

Edo de Roo

It happened twice to me, that medical assistance was needed on a flight. The first time, a doctor was sitting just behind the person in need, so that was good luck. But the second time, it was up to the stewardesses, and then you can be better prepared a bit.

04

We just cancelled today our 3 tickets to Tokyo, Japan. KLM insisten it won’t rebook our tickets to another destination so we “had” to go there or lose the money. They have had their reasons I guess (rules first passengers last?). So we decided to cancel the whole thing, we prefer to lose the €3000 tickets to KLM and to avoid the risk of radioactive radiation in Japan. Dear Caroline, indeed your red First aid kit can be very useful but we won’t need it at home. I wish KLM could show more empathy and understanding of your customers needs. Adding this to your ‘Big Red Book’ will refresh KLM knowledge of flight safety and security I hope.

Harm Kuiper

@04 Are you serious? This is the place where you come to rant? Please respect yourself a bit more.

I really liked the post, i sometimes get a bit nervous on flights with those “what if i questions”. This sure sounds assuring :)

04

Dear Harm,
Let’s don’t get personal, I didn’t mean to Harm you ;-)
and yes I am serious; concidering some facts (& Figures):
a. During the last half year the share price of KLM lost more than 50% of it’s value
b. KLM introducing combi-flights of cargo and passengers (remember the difference between half-full and half-empty?)
c. After the Japanese authorities erased the radioactive health norms with factor 20 above the common world norm it was “safe” enough for KLM to refuse rebooking requests from passengers.

And on a personal note: I always liked to fly KLM and still do, I don’t care that much about the refund they want to keep for themselves but I do regret the respectless attitude they show, hiding behind so-called “rules” and “policy”.
I really hope you do understand it.
I rest my case.

KLM

@04

We appreciate you reading our blog and value your feedback. We regret, however, to read you felt uncomfortable flying to Tokyo recently. KLM is very serious about the health of its passengers and crew. During the aftermath of the Japanese tsunami and Fukushima incident, KLM offered a rebook and refund policy. If you disagree with the options offered at the time, you are welcome to file a complaint at http://klmf.ly/pLgQDC. You can also do so via twitter (http://twitter.com/klm) or facebook (www.facebook.com/klm). We’ll be happy to look into your story.

04

KLM offered a rebook and refund policy for flights until the 8th of May, declared the situation as “stabilised” and refused any rebook option since then. Since the Japanese authorisation upgraded the health norms by 20 times above the accepted world index it became “safe” for KLM to fly there. There are still many reports in the media of radioactive leaks in Fukushima, KLM should know that but apparently preffers to look to the other (commercial) side.

Placing a complaint to KLM wouldn’t help as long as KLM in relying on the (far too high) Japanese health norms that were meant to bring back the situation to “business as usual”
You can fool your customers KLM but there is a moment they won’t trust you anymore, just like it happened to me. I wish you luck with your “health policy”.

04

We just cancelled today our 3 tickets to Tokyo, Japan. KLM insisten it won’t rebook our tickets to another destination so we “had” to go there or lose the money. They have had their reasons I guess (rules first passengers last?). So we decided to cancel the whole thing, we prefer to lose the €3000 tickets to KLM and to avoid the risk of radioactive radiation in Japan. Dear Caroline, indeed your red First aid kit can be very useful but we won’t need it at home. I wish KLM could show more empathy and understanding of your customers needs. Adding this to your ‘Big Red Book’ will refresh KLM knowledge of flight safety and security I hope.

harm kuiper

@04 Are you serious? This is the place where you come to rant? Please respect yourself a bit more.

I really liked the post, i sometimes get a bit nervous on flights with those “what if i questions”. This sure sounds assuring :)

04

Dear Harm,
Let’s don’t get personal, I didn’t mean to Harm you ;-)
and yes I am serious; concidering some facts (& Figures):
a. During the last half year the share price of KLM lost more than 50% of it’s value
b. KLM introducing combi-flights of cargo and passengers (remember the difference between half-full and half-empty?)
c. After the Japanese authorities erased the radioactive health norms with factor 20 above the common world norm it was “safe” enough for KLM to refuse rebooking requests from passengers.

And on a personal note: I always liked to fly KLM and still do, I don’t care that much about the refund they want to keep for themselves but I do regret the respectless attitude they show, hiding behind so-called “rules” and “policy”.
I really hope you do understand it.
I rest my case.

Caroline

@04

We appreciate you reading our blog and value your feedback. We regret, however, to read you felt uncomfortable flying to Tokyo recently. KLM is very serious about the health of its passengers and crew. During the aftermath of the Japanese tsunami and Fukushima incident, KLM offered a rebook and refund policy. If you disagree with the options offered at the time, you are welcome to file a complaint at http://klmf.ly/pLgQDC. You can also do so via twitter (http://twitter.com/klm) or facebook (www.facebook.com/klm). We’ll be happy to look into your story.

KLM

@04

We appreciate you reading our blog and value your feedback. We regret, however, to read you felt uncomfortable flying to Tokyo recently. KLM is very serious about the health of its passengers and crew. During the aftermath of the Japanese tsunami and Fukushima incident, KLM offered a rebook and refund policy. If you disagree with the options offered at the time, you are welcome to file a complaint at http://klmf.ly/pLgQDC. You can also do so via twitter (http://twitter.com/klm) or facebook (www.facebook.com/klm). We’ll be happy to look into your story.

04

KLM offered a rebook and refund policy for flights until the 8th of May, declared the situation as “stabilised” and refused any rebook option since then. Since the Japanese authorisation upgraded the health norms by 20 times above the accepted world index it became “safe” for KLM to fly there. There are still many reports in the media of radioactive leaks in Fukushima, KLM should know that but apparently preffers to look to the other (commercial) side.

Placing a complaint to KLM wouldn’t help as long as KLM in relying on the (far too high) Japanese health norms that were meant to bring back the situation to “business as usual”
You can fool your customers KLM but there is a moment they won’t trust you anymore, just like it happened to me. I wish you luck with your “health policy”.

Leo

Have you ever flew to Romania ?

Caroline

Hi Leo, unfortunately I’ve never flown to Romania, but it’s certainly on my wish list!

Caroline

Hi Leo, unfortunately I’ve never flown to Romania, but it’s certainly on my wish list.

Leo

Have you ever flew to Romania ?

Caroline

Hi Leo, unfortunately I’ve never flown to Romania, but it’s certainly on my wish list.

first aid courses Chicago

This is so nice blog.

first aid courses Chicago

This is so nice blog.

Marcin

Pierwsza pomoc jest bardzo potrzebna.

Marcin

Pierwsza pomoc jest bardzo potrzebna.

Marceloh

I’m loving with your blog! About the post, i’m glad to know that all of yours are training to do the best to us. Well, we never know what can happen later and is very important be apart about those things.

Marceloh

I’m loving with your blog! About the post, i’m glad to know that all of yours are training to do the best to us. Well, we never know what can happen later and is very important be apart about those things.

James Bosell

In this area, include all the fundamental forethought things that your family uses, for example, band helps and antibacterial wipes. Scissors, tweezers, and surgical tape are likewise helpful.

Emily(Jung Eunhae)

I’m collegian in Korea who wants to be a cabin crew. I am investigating for my task. If you don’t mind me asking, May I know contents of the first aid kit? And where is located? I will appreciate your answer.

Emily(Jung Eunhae)

I’m collegian in Korea who wants to be a cabin crew. I am investigating for my task. If you don’t mind me asking, May I know contents of the first aid kit? And I wonder that where is located? I will appreciate your answer.

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